Towns Along The Way – “B”

This second installment of the “Towns Along the Way” series brings us to “B”. There are a wealth of towns starting with “B” so I might as well start by talking about them. I would be interested to hear from anyone who has stayed in any of the below towns. What have your experiences been? Good, bad, indifferent?

Barbadelo (map)

camino-de-santiago-frances-barbadelo-a-mercadoiro-riachueloOne of the first villages you will arrive at on leaving Sarria. In fact, it is 3km from Sarria. It is situated in the province of Lugo and with a population of less than 50, you know you are in Galicia as most of the surrounding area is green. I passed through here in 2011 and vividly remember the large oak tree and half-road-half-stream (left). The village has a number of albergues (www.gronze.com) which you may choose instead of the “mayhem” of Sarria. I hope to visit these parts again in 2016 so my memory is refreshed.

Belorado (map)

2014-09-14 08.31.10

Aha..now I could go on for quite a while about this particular town. It is one of my favourite parts of the Camino. Why you may ask? Well, each time I have stayed here or passed through I have been treated exceptionally well. And I will make sure I visit again on my next Camino. The town itself is located 50km to the west of Burgos and has a population of over 2,000 people. It is also situated close to the Oca Mountains and if the weather is poor, it is not uncommon to see some people take the bus direct to Burgos. Belorado is a well kept town with plenty of murals on the wall. There is a large town plaza with plenty of places to eat. The film “The Way” was shot here also, and if you look at the ground you will see a handprint and autograph of a number of the stars from the film. There are plenty of accommodation here also (www.gronze.com). Cuatro Cantones albergue would be a favourite of mine, having stayed there in 2013 and 2014. Jana and her family will take good care of you. I stayed in Casa Waslala in 2015 and enjoyed my time there also.

Bercianos del Real Camino (map)

natura-ago9

Another example of a blink-and-you’ll-miss-it town along the Camino. Bercianos is a small town about 10km west of Sahagun and it has a population of roughly 200 people. While it is small, it has great character and I have enjoyed my time here. The terrain in this part of Spain is pretty basic, it has to be said, but my time here, I will always remember. If you do opt to stay here (rather than in El Burgo Ranero a further 8km onward), ensure you stay in the Parochial albergue run by a voluntary order (www.gronze.com). It is large, you will be fed well and all you need to do is sing a song from your own country. Rest assured that Bono will never feel threatened after my singing of “I Still Haven’t Found What I’m looking for”!!.

Biduedo (map)

Biduedo, or O Viduedo as Galicians call it, is a tiny village about 7kms from Triacastela. It is a typical rural community with close to 30 people living there. It does it’s best to serve the peregrinos passing through by having a number of private albergues (www.gronze.com) and there are a number of bars to stop at for a few minutes to rest the weary legs. One might find this town the perfect place to stay during the busy times of the Summer months.

Boadilla del Camino (map)

2266129Another pilgrim’s favourite and an end stage in Brierley’s guide book. It’s a favourite of mine and I have stayed here both times I have walked through. It is situated about 60km to the west of Burgos and is in the Meseta, Spain’s high central plateau. The town has a population of about 175 people and lives mainly on agriculture. However in recent years, it depends more on the Camino with more albergues and bars opening to support the increasing numbers. There are quite a few albergues and hostals here (www.gronze.com). By far my favourite would be “En El Camino” owned by Eduardo and his family. I have stayed there in 2013 and in 2015. You are provided with dinner there also. On leaving the next morning, you may even spot some fishermen look for the first catch of the day along the Canal de Castilla.

Boente (map)

Arzúa_Boente_Galiza_4

You will encounter Boente as you walk from Palas de Rei to Arzua in Galicia. It is another small town with a population of less than 50 people and is fairly close to Arzua. It is highly likely that you will not remember much about Boente by the time you reach Santiago. This is perfectly natural however, as at this stage you will have 50km left to walk and you will be trying to think of ways of how to slow time down! Should you wish to stay here and not in Arzua, there are a number of albergues (www.gronze.com).

Burgos (map)

2013-05-30 11.32.20

Burgos is one of the largest cities that you will encounter on the Camino, along with Pamplona, Leon, Astorga and Santiago herself. It has a population of over 200,000 people and is in the autonomous community of Castille y Leon. It is a fairly large city and there is a good distance to walk before you at it’s heart – the Cathedral. The Cathedral (left) was declared a world heritage site in 1984 by UNESCO and I strongly encourage you to visit it no matter how weary the feet are! Many people choose to take a rest day on reaching Burgos to visit the sites and recover. Another option is to walk a short day the following day. There is a wealth of accommodation as you would expect in a major city (www.gronze.com) however I have stayed in the cheap-as-pie municipal albergue beside the Cathedral. For €5 you can’t go wrong. Leaving Burgos brings you to the Meseta, which kind of puts people off walking the next 100km. I am baffled by this myself. The meseta is my favourite part.

El Burgo Ranero (map)

Situated some 8km from Bercianos de Real Camino and 18km from Sahagun, El Burgo Ranero is a small town located in the province of Leon. It holds a population of over 850 people and the Camino goes down it’s main road. I have stopped here on two occasions for cafe con leche, preferring to stay in Bercianos and Sahagun. There are a number of albergues here should you wish to stay (www.gronze.com). On leaving El Burgo Ranero, the path is on the whole uninspiring until you reach the large city of Leon, some 35km away. In May of 2015, I met two Irish ladies here who spoke in Irish. It was a shame I couldn’t join them in their conversation however!

Burguete (map)

783001

From the end of the meseta in El Burgo Ranero, we travel back 400km eastward to the town of Burguete. It is located in Navarre and is the first town you will encounter on leaving Roncesvalles. Many people call it by it’s proper Basque name “Auritz”. Ernest Hemingway lodged in Burguete in 1924 and 1925 for a fishing trip to the Irati River, and describes it in his novel The Sun Also Rises. 

The town has a number of albergues (www.gronze.com) but many people choose to stop here for breakfast before moving on to Zubiri or Larrasoana. It is one of the more picturesque towns along the Way, with white facades and red window shutters a feature for many Basque houses.

The next installment will feature towns beginning with C.

7 thoughts on “Towns Along The Way – “B”

    • I really enjoyed Burgos. There is alot to see there but on the two occassions I stayed there I was too tired to travel farther than the Cathedral. I must put some time aside to just visit the city.

  1. Stopped in everyone of those but only for a bite to eat. The only one I slept in was Burgos. Boadilla was my target last April/May but when I got there and rested up in the albergue/restaurant and had a good meal, Fromista did not seem that far away so I walked on. Maybe next time 🙂

    • I stopped in most, bar the towns in Galicia. I have stayed in Belorado, Boadilla, Burgos and Bercianos. I can’t fault Boadilla, so you must stay in “En El Camino” the next time you go back.

  2. Bercianos del Real Camino is a very special place to my wife, Barbara, and me. It is where we were forced to finish our our first attempt at walking the Camino Frances, but also where we restarted to complete the way. We had started at St Jean Pied de Port and all had gone well with our walk until after Burgos when Barbara developed foot problems. By Sahagun they were getting bad and the following day, as we walked towards Bercianos it became obvious that we had to stop, rather than risking serious problems. During a rest break we decided that we would only walk as far as Bercianos then go to the first cafe or bar we saw and ask them to get us a taxi back to Sahagun so that we could get the train to start our return to the UK.

    As we entered Bercianos we saw the Casa del Peregrino and went in. This is a rather nice bar. We ordered coffees and as we waited for them to brew Barbara noticed a pile of paperback books at near the coffee machine. They were all copies of a Spanish crime novel set on the Camino, “El Asesino de la Via Lactea” . Barbara is a fluent speaker and reader of Spanish and had actually read, and greatly enjoyed, this book during the early stages of our walk. She mentioned this to the lady serving us who seemed most surprised. “Where did you get a copy?” she asked. “From Amazon, I have it on my Kindle” was Barbara’s reply. “The author is my father …” said Andrea (as we later learned was her name) “..and the book is dedicated to me and my husband. He will be really pleased that someone from another country has read and enjoyed his book. I must ring him and tell him about it”. We were as surprised as she was at the coincidence and decided to buy a copy, which was signed by the author. We then retired into the garden to drink our coffees shortly to be joined by Andrea who said that she had spoken to her father who was extremely pleased with her story and requested that Barbara contacted him by email when we got home, his email address being in the book.

    Andrea then arranged for a taxi to Sahagun and we parted with big hugs and promises from us to return in the Spring of 2015 to resume our camino. Shortly after our return to the UK Barbara contacted the author, Gabriel Martinez, as requested and thus started a series of fairly regular emails between them that continues to this day.

    We did return to Bercianos in May 2015, but unfortunately had chosen to arrive there on the only day in the week when the bar is closed, so unfortunately didn’t see Andrea again but the emails to her father continue.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s