Camino Frances 2017 – Day 4 – Carrión de los Condes to Terradillos de los Templarios

Camino 2017 – Day 4 – Carrión de los Condes to Terradillos de los Templarios – September 8th
A long road at morning and a goodbye

5am…my silent alarm wakes me. Automatically, I wake June who is sleeping in the bunk beside me. We gather our things and quietly make our way to the kitchen for some breakfast. Officially, the albergue was not due to open until 7am but we noticed their was a back door open so we were in luck. June and myself were joined by the Brazilian contingent who were feasting on a healthy breakfast. I finished off my last yoghurt and started to pack what food I had in the top of my pack.

Today’s walk was a major talking point among pilgrims for days. It was no secret that this stage is one of the toughest. There are no steep climbs or large descents. There are no off-putting cities that we need to pass through. Quite the opposite actually, as the next town is 17kms away – Calzadilla de la Cueza. Now, we walk the flat Vía Aquitania without stop. Both myself and June were eager to get going however and we left the albergue just after 5.30am. We were expecting the same heat as the last few days so we prepared. I had plenty of water and some fruit to tide me over until the first town.

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It was dark and, save for a few street lights in Carrion, there was no light. We struggled to find the way but once we saw the San Zoilo Hotel and the Rio Carrion, we knew were going the right way. I was delighted to be joined by June. Any company makes the journey easier, but it was different with June. She was talkative and really interested in what was ahead of her. As I had walked to Santiago, I was glad to answer any questions she had. She had a great pace also which matched mine, despite the pains in my feet. The morning was quiet, we saw a few other pilgrims as we left the town. We wished them a Buen Camino as we passed them by. There was an eerie fog that had fallen over Carrion and we knew that it would be that way until the sun rose. That was to be the case. We literally saw nothing. It was dark and insanely foggy. It was the perfect time to be walking with someone else. The mist was dripping from the trees from each side of the trail. I considered putting on my jacket at one stage. It wasn’t cold either.

The Vía Aquitania is one long stretch and it was impossible to stray from it. We constantly joked with each other saying that the next visible object was a building in Calzadilla, only to be a haystack. I enjoyed the morning and by the time we reached the first time, I had felt that I knew June. It was 9.30 as we saw the municipal albergue and we cheered like it was Santiago itself. The last few pilgrims leaving this albergue questioned if we had got a taxi from Carrion! It was some achievement but it had consequences. My 5th toe on my left foot had been hurting for some time and I thought it was time to slow down. I had been taking ibuprofen for a few days also. I enjoyed walking with new people but needed to constantly remind myself that they had been walking for 2 weeks prior to meeting myself. They had their own limits – some greater than mine. I had met folks who frequently walked 40km days, while there were others walking 15km per day. There are no rules and we can walk according to our strengths. However, when you meet people whose company you enjoy, you try and stay with them no matter how you feel.

I enjoyed my cafe con leche and tostado and did some stretches before throwing my pack back on. We were ready but I had a feeling that I would be saying “see you on the trail” to June soon. As predicted, the sun had washed away the fog to reveal the way in it’s glory. We left Calzadilla de la Cueza close to 10am and walked alongside the N-120 – a quieter version of the road I had walked beside the day before. Sometimes, we walked on the road, while other times we preferred the senda to it’s side. Either way, June wasn’t far ahead of me. We kept passing large arrows made of individual stones and wondered how long it took to make these. There was one impressive one of an arrow leading to a heart, closer to Ledigos.

I had decided on staying in either Ledigos or Terradillos, the evening before. The next town beyond Terradillos was Moratinos, which would have made it a 30km day. I began thinking that I really needed to slow down as I didn’t want to walk further than Astorga. I had plenty of days left, but the more big days I had, the more I would have to consider having rest days!! Ledigos is next to nothing, size wise. June commented that it smelled like a farm…which is probably correct. Good luck in Galicia, I said to her! I decided to move on as neither albergue was open and Terradillos held good memories for me. Leaving Ledigos, you can actually see Terradillos. It is that close. It is pretty confusing leaving this small town also, as there are two ways to get to Terradillos. We chose the road as I didn’t want to get lost (again!) by walking on the trail through the fields.

After 2km, I saw Albergue los Templarios and decided to stay here. It was 12am and the sun was at it’s highest. June had more energy left and wanted to walk on. The time had come to say goodbye…although I never say goodbye on the Camino. “I’ll see you on the trail”, I said while giving her a hug. She walked to San Nicolás de Real Camino that afternoon. We exchanged email addresses and promised to keep in touch.

Not surprisingly, I was the first to grab a bunk here, although most of the beds had been reserved in advance. The Camino is changing. I had stayed here in 2013 and remember the fun times I had with a great Camino family I met then. The place hadn’t changed, everything has remained in it’s place. The couple from Perth arrived in shortly later on bikes. They were travelling the meseta on bikes and then taking up walking at Leon. I sat outside on the terrace and watched people check in. Most I didn’t know, while some I knew stopped to say they were walking on to the next town. Within 2 hours, this albergue was completo – and the other albergue in the town of Terradillos was full shortly after.

I got some rest and woke for dinner at 7pm. I had dinner with a large group who had arranged their Camino through a travel agency. They were walking the Camino their way, they said. Sleep came early tonight as I promised to get up early and aim for El Burgo Ranero – a town I have not stayed in. I wonder could I do it. If I could, the remaining 5 days would be short. I suppose that’s something to look forward to. It was to be another hot day the following day – I would be prepared.

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