Hace dos meses….

I returned from Burgos on the 14th of September with a new found energy, and maybe a desire to return again. But surely that isn’t that bad? Nearly two months have passed since I returned to Ireland.

Since then, I have tried to keep the Camino alive. Many times have I wanted to book a flight to Spain and walk a few days on one of the many Caminos. Many times have I have browsed through the prices for flights. But not this year. It’s just not possible.

I will return next May to A Coruña and walk to Santiago, and maybe walk to the coast. Watching the sun set in Finisterre is special and the right end to a pilgrimage.

The last few months have seen me ‘giving back’. The winter edition of Shamrocks and Shells – the Camino Society of Ireland’s online newsletter is now published. I have been its editor since its creation at the start of the year.

I’d ask you to check it out and if you would like to contribute to it, please let me know. You can find details at www.ShamrocksandShells.com

A New Camino, and a return to Galicia

I thoroughly enjoyed my ramble through Navarra and La Rioja in September. The weather was fine, many people were met but the days spent there trickled away all too quickly. I hope to keep in touch with my new found friends electronically, and maybe we will meet in the months and years to come. On arriving in Burgos, I sat in the municipal albergue and had a few moments to myself. I thought about the next one, the next footstep to Santiago, or even if there was to be one!

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The majority of my Caminos since 2011 have been on the French Way, and I don’t see that changing as my main Camino in the near future. My feet are safe there. I will dip in and out and walk a week here and there. I’ve grown to like the people of La Rioja and Castilla y Leon and made friends in Burgos and Belorado. I get great joy from meeting people, staying in different villages, wandering through the meseta especially. But I have unfinished business.

On the 18th of June 2017, I walked from Bray to St. James Church (32km), the first part of the Celtic Camino and on the 19th of May this year,  I walked St Kevin’s way to Glendalough. So I have a Celtic Camino Compostela for the short distance walked in Ireland. The next stage is to walk the remainder (75km) to Santiago from A Coruña – hopefully, May 2019. This should take 3-4 days. This is a little too short for my liking so I will extend it by walking to Finisterre, another 3-4 days.

I hope I can bring my brother with me. It would mean a lot if he is available for the trip. He has the Celtic Camino Compostela also, having walked from Bray to St. James Church on two occasions.

For more information about the Celtic Camino and the Camino Ingles in general, check out the below links:

Information on the Celtic Camino on Camino Society Ireland
Guidebook to the Celtic Camino
Camino Ingles on Eroski

La-Coruña-arriba-Izqda-Galicia

Breogán and the Tower of Hercules / Source: Wikipedia

How To Pack For The Camino de Santiago

For Mightygoods.com

My name is David, I’m from Dublin, Ireland, however, my heart is in Spain.

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I discovered the Camino de Santiago in 2010 and since then I have been venturing back and forth one or twice a year. Shortly after my first Camino to Santiago, I started to write about my times in Spain in 2012 and more recently, I have been ‘giving something back’ to my local Camino association. I have walked the Camino Frances seven times, the Camino Portuguese Coastal Route once and the Camino Finisterre once. But what gives me greater satisfaction is assisting those who have yet to walk to Santiago through the Camino Society of Ireland. In the future, I hope to return to Santiago and volunteer in the Pilgrim Office in Santiago in the coming years.

 What top 3 things do you bring besides the common stuff all Camino de Santiago hikers bring?

There are 3 things that I recommend pilgrims carry with them at all times no matter the Camino:

  • Gehwol 75ml Foot cream – Strengthens your skin. Rub this on your feet each morning and you won’t have any blisters. 
  • Buff – An essential item, and one that can cover a variety of places. I am running thin on top so this was perfect for me. It covers my neck when the sun is out too. A must.
  • Travel journal – always take notes on the Camino. It’s so easy to forget the littlest of things when you return home.

How do you bring things with you?

I have always used Lowe Alpine when it came to rucksacks. Up to 2018, I owned an AirZone Pro 35:45, however, I have recently switched to an AirZone Trail 35. Both packs have been very comfortable and have not caused me any problems during my Caminos. However, everyone is different and it is important if you are in need of a backpack to visit an outdoors store and get the pack fitted.

When walking, I ensure that I have what I need close at hand, either in an over-the-shoulder bag or in the top pocket of my backpack. My shoulder bag would usually hold money, passport, pilgrim passport, guidebook, and phone. I usually keep my lunch in the top pocket – a yogurt, some fruit, some nuts, chocolate.

In the main compartment, all the other items are separated into dry bags. Ex-ped are a great brand and you can usually buy a pack of 5. My clothes are in one bag, toiletries in another, electricals (phone chargers, adapters) in another. My medication is kept in another bag and the last bag is for the blister kit.

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What are your top tips for other Camino de Santiago hikers?

-The Camino de Santiago is all about the people you meet, and the stories you tell, the bonds you build. The lives you lead before arriving get left behind and they don’t matter. Friendships last forever on the Camino. I have seen it. While there is a lot of advice to start your Camino 100 km out from Santiago, the road will be very busy and there are more routes than the Camino Frances. Why not walk the Portuguese Coastal Route, or the less busy Camino Norte?

-Start early. Hitting the trail between 7 and 8am means you avoid the worst of the day’s heat. There’s nothing better than watching a sunrise on the meseta.

– Drink plenty of water. It can be hot on the Camino, so be sure to replenish all those fluids you’re losing through hard work.

Download a suggested packing list

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

With a little Help from my Friends…

Hello friends and happy weekend.

It has been a busy time since I returned from Burgos. I see little daytime and I return home from the office with another day to look forward to. If only things were as simple as they are on the Camino. Every step made is one less to your destination, but it’s the journey that matters more.

I hope to travel to Spain more than once next year so I really want to push ahead and take that extra step with my writing. Some have said that I should write a book based on my many Caminos but the confidence (and the contacts) isn’t there yet. In the future, I may take up the offer. For the time being, however,  I want to increase my followers and viewers here. My viewing figures for my last number of posts have been so low that it is really discouraging. I do like to write but not for 20 people.

So, friends, if you do like my posts, please like and share them. I am in the process of publishing the quarterly newsletter for the Camino Society of Ireland, which should be ready to view shortly. I would ask you to read those stories too.  I will post that link when it is ready.

Buen Camino a todos / todas!

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A pilgrim friend walking through La Rioja

 

Camino Frances 2018 – A 2nd day in Burgos, Burgos Cathedral and Home

September 20th & 21st, 2018 – Day 9 & 10
Burgos

It was an early morning. Truth be told I should have stayed in a private room and got a few hours more sleep. The albergue wanted everyone to leave before 8am. Poor me! So I got up, packed and had breakfast in the cafe across from the albergue. I was delighted to be joined by Jim who decided to take a day’s rest. He was having some foot problems and wanted to rest before tackling the meseta. I also met 2 Argentinian pilgrims – Marcos and Santiago. They had pretty good English but I encouraged them to speak Spanish to me so I can improve on that front.

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Jim, Marcos and Santiago, on no walking days

After breakfast, we all agreed to visit the Cathedral. Bringing your credential gets you a pilgrim rate, so that’s handy. Even though I’ve been in the Cathedral twice before, I am blown away by the work. It is always full with tourists so early morning is a good time. You get an audio tour too. The following image was posted on Instagram and has been shared by the Spanish tourist board.

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The rear of Burgos Cathedral

And some photos of the interior of the Cathedral…

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Afterward, I checked in to a Hostal that I had booked before arriving in Burgos. I left my bag there and walked back to the cafe outside the albergue. Jim was there and there was already a healthy queue forming with pilgrims for the albergue. The beat goes on. It was good to see some people that I met along the Way and I lost touch. We shared stories over a drink and swapped contact details.

Later that evening, I visited a friend who lives in Burgos and afterward I went back to the hostal to pack for the bus to Bilbao. My Camino was closing to an end but the many people I had met had weeks to go yet, I hoped to follow them to Santiago.

Until next year.

Camino Frances 2018 – Atapuerca to Burgos

September 19th, 2018 – Day 8
Atapuerca to Burgos, 18km

Another early morning. Most of the albergue was awake having their breakfast in some shape or form. Bruno, Jim, Karsten, Ben and Blanka were all eager to reach Burgos. But it was quite a cold morning. Fog had descended during the night and there was danger it would still be in the hills if we left too early. We had the stars to guide us so. Jim decided to hold back and walk with Ben so I walked on with Karsten, Bruno and Blanka. We would meet in Burgos, however.

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Leaving Atapauerca, we had a short climb ahead of us to get to the Matagrande. Onwards I went passing Villafria with no bar open for breakfast. The road was quiet and there was almost an eerie sense with the low fog and the stars out. We stopped for a bit when we reached the Sierra de Atapuerca and looked back at the climb we achieved. The sun was peeking over the horizon but it wasn’t ready to make an appearance just yet.

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There was plenty of chat among us and I was happy to learn that a friend of Bruno’s family had entered and contested the Rose of Tralee. So he was Irish in my books. I had his novel in my backpack and I was looking forward to diving into it headfirst once I returned home. We stopped at Cardenuela Riopico for some breakfast, however, Blanka decided her foot would feel better if she walked on and did not stop. We would meet again in Burgos. I witnessed my final sunrise on this Camino – it was magical, while having a croissant and cafe con leche. After a while, the 3 amigos, Bruno, Karsten and myself walked on to Burgos. The sun was up but there was still a chill in the air.

We still had a good 2 hours yet before we reached the albergue. There was much talk about an alternative route, to avoid the slog through the industrial area into Burgos. The alternative meant following the River Pico into the city – it is somewhat more scenic. This diversion is laid out on a sign at the side of the road and it gives pilgrims directions into Burgos. Most guidebooks would have this alternative listed.

We were in Burgos by midday and at the albergue shortly after. The albergue is close by the gothic cathedral standing tall in the main square. There is already a queue as we arrive and we sit in the cafe to wait. There is no hurry. This albergue has many beds! Soon, I see Jim and Ben and Blanka and I meet new faces. I decide to visit the Cathedral the following day as I have a day spare. All I have to do now is check-in and find somewhere to eat!

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Shortly, I saw Doug again. It’s amazing how the big cities bring everyone together again. Later that evening, Karsten, Doug and I went for a meal in Burgos. It was pretty filling. We went back to the cafe outside the albergue and chatted to our fellow pilgrims. It was sad not to be walking with them. But some would be taking a rest day so I would enjoy their company the following day before I travelled to Bilbao.

Link – 21 Pilgrims Share how they prepare for the Camino de Santiago

A new and worthwhile link for you.

To improve how we pack, the guys at the following site have talked with 21 experienced pilgrims and asked them to share their best advice on kit and packing.

Read on and learn from their best tips and tricks.

https://mightygoods.com/camino-de-santiago-hikers-packing/

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